Drawing Aptitude In JEE MAINS PAPER-2

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JEE MAINS PAPER-2 is divided into three parts namely- General Aptitude, Mathematics and Drawing.The paper consist of 390 marks.To check about basic info related to paper-2 click here. The Drawing Test is the 3rd part of the JEE MAINS PAPER-2 which consist of 2 questions of 70 marks.Question 1 is divided into 2 parts 20 marks each.Below are the questions that came in JEE(Main)-2014 Paper II 

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JEE(Main)-2014 Paper II

question-jee-mains-paper-2

JEE(Main)-2014 Paper II

question-jee-mains-paper-2

JEE(Main)-2014 Paper II

 

Generally the topics which are covered in these questions include – Sketching of activities or scenes from memory of urban scenes like market, street scenes, recreational spaces, public space, monuments, etc or landscape like gardens, river fronts, jungles,etc  and rural life.Drawing and designing of geometrical or abstract shapes and patterns in pencil, Transformation of forms both 2 D and 3 D union, Elevations and 3 D views of objects Rotation, Development of surfaces and volumes, Generation of Plan, Creating 2D and 3D compositions using given shapes and forms.

Three dimensional – perception: Understanding and appreciation of scale and proportion of objects, building forms and elements, color texture, harmony and contrast. Design and drawing of geometrical or abstract shapes and patterns in pencil. Transformation of forms both 2 D and 3 D union, subtraction, rotation, development of surfaces and volumes, Generation of Plan, elevations and 3 D views of objects. Creating two dimensional and three dimensional compositions using given shapes and forms. Sketching of scenes and memory retention are the points you need to focus on.

 

How to visualize 3-D shapes from 2-D drawings ?

 

  • Imagination and aesthetic sensitivity: Composition exercise with given elements. Context mapping.Creativity check through innovative uncommon test with familiar objects.Sense of colour grouping or application.
  • Three-dimensional perception: An representation of a image on a flat surface as seen by the eye.
  • Geometrical drawing: The art of representing the geometrical objects such as square, rectangle, triangle,etc on a piece of paper. Knowledge of different shapes helps in composing them in design.
  • Memory drawing: For memory drawing sketching is essential. It means an individuals imagination is given shape in form of drawing. For this close observation of places and things are required.

This section is very scoring for people who are good in sketching.Though don’t worry if you are bad at it. Architects need not to be good at sketching.Don’t believe me check it by yourself –

 

Do you have to be good at Sketching to be an Architect?

 

  • One-point perspective – A drawing has one-point perspective when it contains only one vanishing point on the horizon line. This type of perspective is typically used for images of roads, railway tracks, hallways, or buildings viewed so that the front is directly facing the viewer. Any objects that are made up of lines either directly parallel with the viewer’s line of sight or directly perpendicular (the railroad slats) can be represented with one-point perspective. These parallel lines converge at the vanishing point.

 

 

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One-point perspective

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One-point perspective

  •  Two-point perspective – A drawing has two-point perspective when it contains two vanishing points on the horizon line. In an illustration, these vanishing points can be placed arbitrarily along the horizon. Two-point perspective can be used to draw the same objects as one-point perspective, rotated: looking at the corner of a house, or at two forked roads shrinking into the distance, for example. One point represents one set of parallel lines, the other point represents the other. Seen from the corner, one wall of a house would recede towards one vanishing point while the other wall recedes towards the opposite vanishing point.
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Two-point perspective

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Two-point perspective

  • Three-point perspective  – Three-point perspective is often used for buildings seen from above (or below). In addition to the two vanishing points from before, one for each wall, there is now one for how the vertical lines of the walls recede. For an object seen from above, this third vanishing point is below the ground. For an object seen from below, as when the viewer looks up at a tall building, the third vanishing point is high in space.
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Three-point perspective

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Three-point perspective

 

Mathematically, however, all three are identical; the difference is merely in the relative orientation of the rectilinear scene to the viewer.

 

JEE Paper 2- The Basics

 

Syllabus of Mathematics In JEE MAINS PAPER-2

 

What are Plans , Elevations and Sections ?

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